ianception:

Royal Ontario Museum

(Source: wfdp, via qors)

notebook of a Durand student, 1823

Meeghan: On the second floor of SCI-Arc, It is a small common area for students or visitors to have a seat and study, eat, or just simply chill. The crystal-like structure on the window proceeds along the ceiling and rooftop window as well with gradations of pink, purple, blue and white. 

2 notes • 11:33 PM

Meeghan: This is a small daycare centre designed to have a sufficient amount of natural sunlight. Rather than the usual rectangular shape of a daycare centre, it is made to attract children and make them feel more welcome.

1 note • 1:46 PM

Ian: This home provides a safe environment which children can play in. Sliding glass doors are all around the centre of the home. 

(Source: meenarchitecture)

2 notes • 7:39 PM

Ian: Many residences in Vancouver do not provide enough privacy, as space is a premium, especially in town houses. Units are close to each other and are narrow. The use of large glass windows for good natural lighting further accentuates the issue.

I have maximized the privacy level of a multiple-unit complex with the minimal sacrifice of space in the given ground area, by designing different floor plans for each of the three units, and adopting tilted windows. 

Complete isolation of the three units is created by the elimination of shared walls, and the staggered levels maximizes the use of vertical space. The jigsaw-staggering provides certain floors with a wide area.

These independent units are similar to townhouses, but are completely isolated from each other as detached homes are. These units provide the privacy closer to that of detached homes than that of townhouses, but occupy less total ground space and are more affordable than detached homes. 

The windows on the upper levels are tilted slightly upwards, further enhancing the privacy. These tilted windows reflect the sky towards outsiders and prevent them from seeing the inside during daytime; they are especially effective during cloudy days, which are frequent in Vancouver.